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Keith E Rice's Integrated SocioPsychology Blog & Pages

Aligning, integrating and applying the behavioural sciences

Stephanie Van Goozen’

My SAD Experience

A few weeks ago I self-diagnosed myself as experiencing a mild dose of Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD). This milder form of SAD is known colloquially as ‘the Winter Blues’ and clinically as Sub-Syndromal SAD. Starting on the Sunday of that week, I grew increasingly miserable and even became tearful at times. Over most of the next week I was lethargic, missed the gym, couldn’t be bothered with going out and really struggled to put on ‘a happy face’ for my tutees and adult education evening classes. Sub-Syndromal SAD is estimated to afflict some 21% of the UK population while full-blown SAD reduces a further 8% to a dysfunctional state (Seasonal Affective Disorder Association, 2017) The influence of the seasons on health was recognised in ancient times – viz Hippocrates writing (c400 BC): “…whoever wishes to pursue properly the science of medicine…[must] consider what effects each season of the year can produce”. Over 2 millennia later Philippe Pinel (1806), one of the founders of modern Psychiatry, reflected Hippocrates when he encouraged medical students to ensure “due attention is paid to the changes in the seasons and the weather”. One of the earliest and most poignant descriptions of what we now know as SAD… Read More

Biological Factors in Crime #2

PART 2 Hormones In 1980 Dan Olweus et al measured blood testosterone level in institutionalised delinquent and non-delinquent 16-year-old boys and assessed aggression using a questionnaire. High levels of self-reported physical and verbal aggression were associated with higher levels of testosterone – though the results were not statistically significant. It was also noted that those with higher levels of testosterone were likely to respond more vigorously in response to challenges from teachers and peers. John Archer (1991), in a meta-analysis of 5 studies covering 230 males, found a low positive correlation between testosterone and aggression. However, the type of participant and the form and measurement of aggression differed substantially between the studies. Angela Book, Katherine Starzyk & Vernon Quensy (2001), in a meta-analysis of 45 studies, found a mean correlation of 0.14 between testosterone and aggression – though John Archer, Nicola Graham-Kevan & Michelle Davies (2005) challenged Book, Starzyk & Quinsey’s findings on the grounds of methodological problems with the study which meant that a correlation of 0.08 was more appropriate.  James Dabbs et al (1987) measured salivary testosterone in 89 violent and non-violent criminals and found those with a history of primarily violent crime had the highest levels of testosterone whereas… Read More

Bibliography V

A    B    C    D    E    F    G    H    I    J    K    L    M    N    O    P-Q    R    S     T     U    V    W    X-Y-Z Vallaise, Justin (2010): ‘Eurabian Follies: the Shoddy and Just Plain Wrong Genre that refuses to die’ (Foreign Policy) http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2010/01/04/eurabian_follies?page=0,2 (Accessed: 03/06/13) Van Avermaet, Eddy (2001): ‘Social Influences in Small Groups’ in Miles Hewstone & Wolfgang Stroebe (eds): ‘Introduction to Social Psychology’ (3rd Edition, Blackwell, Oxford UK) Van Dusen, Katherin, Sarnoff Mednick, William Gabrielli & Barry Hutchings (1983): ‘Social Class and Crime in an Adoption Cohort’ in Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology 74/1 Van Goozen, Stephanie, Heddeke Snoek, Graeme Fairchild & Gordon Harold (2007): ‘The Evidence for a Neurobiological Model of Childhood Anti-Social Behaviour’ in Psychological Behaviour #133 Van IJzendoorn, Marinus & Pieter Kroonenberg (1988): ‘Cross-Cultural Patterns of Attachment: a Meta-Analysis of the Strange Situation’ in Child Development #59 Van IJzendoorn, Marinus & Abraham Sagi (2008): ‘Cross-Cultural Patterns of Attachment’ in Jude Cassidy & Phil Shaver (eds): ‘Handbook of Attachment’  (Guilford Press, New York NY) Van IJzendoorn, Marinus, Abraham Sagi &  Miryam Lambermon (1992): ‘The Multiple Caretaker Paradox: Data from Holland and Israel’ in New Directions for Child and Adolescent Development #57 Van Orden, Kimberley, Tracy Witte, Kelly Cukrowicz,… Read More