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Keith E Rice's Integrated SocioPsychology Blog & Pages

Aligning, integrating and applying the behavioural sciences

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What is Romantic Love? #3

PART 3 Triangle of Love Following on from their work on the famous  Love Quiz, Phil Shaver & Cindy Hazan  (Phil Shaver, Cindy Hazan & Donna Bradshaw, 1988) proposed that love is composed of 3 behavioural systems:- attachment caregiving sexuality The 3 systems interact to produce the adult love style. According to Shaver, Hazan & Bradshaw, the attachment and caregiving systems are acquired in infancy. The latter is knowledge gained about how one cares for others, learned by modelling the behaviour of the primary attachment figure – effectively an internal working model of John Bowlby’s Continuity Hypothesis. The sexuality system is also learned in relation to early attachment – eg: insecure-avoidant individuals, with their PURPLE vMEME’s safety-in-belonging needs unfulfilled, are more likely to have the view that sex without love is pleasurable There is considerable correspondence with the work of Berscheid & Walster, as well as the Triangle of Love theory of Robert J Sternberg (1986). Shaver, Hazan & Bradshaw, for example, proposed that companionate love would include attachment and caregiving but not necessarily sexuality. Passionate or romantic love might involve only sexuality. Sternberg’s theory is, in his own words, a theory of ‘consummate love’, comprised of components or elements. The model is illustrated below… Sternberg explains the… Read More

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Biological Factors in Crime #2

PART 2 Hormones In 1980 Dan Olweus et al measured blood testosterone level in institutionalised delinquent and non-delinquent 16-year-old boys and assessed aggression using a questionnaire. High levels of self-reported physical and verbal aggression were associated with higher levels of testosterone – though the results were not statistically significant. It was also noted that those with higher levels of testosterone were likely to respond more vigorously in response to challenges from teachers and peers. John Archer (1991), in a meta-analysis of 5 studies covering 230 males, found a low positive correlation between testosterone and aggression. However, the type of participant and the form and measurement of aggression differed substantially between the studies. Angela Book, Katherine Starzyk & Vernon Quensy (2001), in a meta-analysis of 45 studies, found a mean correlation of 0.14 between testosterone and aggression – though John Archer, Nicola Graham-Kevan & Michelle Davies (2005) challenged Book, Starzyk & Quinsey’s findings on the grounds of methodological problems with the study which meant that a correlation of 0.08 was more appropriate.  James Dabbs et al (1987) measured salivary testosterone in 89 violent and non-violent criminals and found those with a history of primarily violent crime had the highest levels of testosterone whereas… Read More

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So the Turkeys did vote for Christmas?!?

Well,  obviously it remains to be seen just how much damage Brexit does to the UK – socially, economically and politically. But the initial consequences do not look at all good: Britain’s credit rating downgraded, the pound struggling to get much above the rock bottom it hit on Monday, up and down (but mostly down) stocks and shares (with markets right around the world affected), the banks and many big companies drawing up relocation plans (with consequent loss of jobs), a mooted 25% of companies declaring a freeze on hiring staff, a significant increase in incidents of racial and ethnic abuse, momentum building for a second Scottish independence referendum and Martin McGuinness calling for a referendum on whether the island of Ireland should be reunited. The ‘serious’ newspapers and internet news sites are full of dire predictions of far worse to come. As the so-called ‘Project Fear’ appears to be turning rapidly into reality, it would be foolish indeed to say blandly everything is going to be OK, as Boris Johnson was doing on Monday morning. The pound and the markets were stable he stated an hour or so before the pound hit a 31-year low. Everything is not OK. Not in the slightest. The UK faces an existential… Read More

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Bibliography X-Y-Z

A    B    C    D    E    F    G    H    I    J    K    L    M    N    O    P-Q    R    S     T     U    V    W    X-Y-Z Yagamuchi, Susumu, David Kuhlman & Shinkich Sugimori (1995): ‘Personality Correlates of Allocentric Tendencies in Individualistic and Collectivistic Cultures’ in Journal of Cross Cultural Psychology 26/6 Yang, Yaling, Adrian Raine, Katherine Narr, Patrick Colletti & Arthur  Toga (2009): ‘Localization of Deformations within the Amygdala in Individuals with Psychopathy’ in Archives of General Psychiatry 66/9 Yankelovich, Daniel (1981): ‘New Rules, searching for Self-Fulfilment in a World turned Upside Down’ (Random House, New York NY) Yap, Pow Meng (1969): ‘The Culture-Bound Reactive Syndromes’ in William Caudill and Tsung-Yi Lin (eds): ‘Mental Health Research in Asia and the Pacific‘ (East-West Centre Press, Honolulu HW) Ye’Or, Bat (2005): ‘Eurabia: the Euro-Arab Axis’ (Fairleigh Dickinson University Press) Yelsma, Paul & Kuriakose Athappily (1988): ‘Marital Satisfaction and Communication Practices: Comparisons among Indian and American Couples’ in Journal of Comparative Family Studies 19/1 Yeudall, Lorne, Delee Fromm-Auch  & Priscilla Davies (1982): ‘Neuropsychological Impairment of Persistent Delinquency’ in Journal of Mental & Nervous Disease 170/5 Yip, Paul Siu, Eric Caine, Saman Yousuf, Shu-Sen Chang, Kevin Chien-Chang Wu & Ying-Yeh Chen (2012): ‘Means Restriction for Suicide Prevention’… Read More

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Bibliography D

A    B    C    D    E    F    G    H    I    J    K    L    M    N    O    P-Q    R    S     T     U    V    W    X-Y-Z d’Ancona, Matthew (2018): ‘Enoch Powell is gone, but his Hateful Tricks are still with Us’ in The Guardian (16 April) Dabbs, James, Timothy Carr, Robert Frady & Jasmin Riad (1995): ‘Testosterone, Crime and Misbehaviour among 692 Male Prison Inmates’ in Personality & Individual Differences #18 Dabbs, James, F J Bernieri, R K Strong, Rebecca Campo & R Milun (2001): ‘Going on Stage: Testosterone in Greetings and Meetings’ in Journal of Research in Personality 35/1 Dabbs, James, Robert Frady, Timothy Carr & Norma Besch (1987): ‘Saliva Testosterone and Criminal Violence in Young Adult Prison Inmates’ in Psychosomatic Medicine #49 Dabbs, James, & Marian Hargrove (1997): ‘Age, Testosterone and Behaviour among Female Prison Inmates’ in Psychosomatic Medicine 59/5 Dabbs, James, Gregory Jurkovic & Robert Frady (1991): ‘Salivary Testosterone and Cotisol among Late Adolescent Male Offenders’ in Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology #19 Daily Telegraph (2014): ‘MH17: Dutch PM urges Ukraine to stop fighting near Crash Site’ (29 July) Daily Telegraph (2017): ‘More than Half of Britons now want to stay in EU, Poll finds, in Biggest… Read More

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Bibliography A

A    B    C    D    E    F    G    H    I    J    K    L    M    N    O    P-Q    R    S     T     U    V    W    X-Y-Z Abrahams, Jessica (2015): ‘Are Men Natural Born Criminals? The Prison Numbers don’t lie’ in Daily Telegraph (13 January) Abramson, Lyn Y, Martin E P Seligman & John Teasdale (1978): ‘Learned Helplessness in Humans: Critique and Reformulation’ in Journal of Abnormal Psychology #87 Adams, Henry, Lester Wright & Bethany Lohr (1996): ‘Is Homophobia associated with Homosexual Arousal?’ in Journal of Abnormal Psychology 105/3 Adizes, Ichak (1987): ‘Corporate LifeCycles: How and Why Corporations Grow and Die and What to Do About It’ (Prentice Hall Press, Englewood Cliffs NJ) Adizes, Ichak (1996): ‘ The Pursuit of Prime: maximise Your Company’s Success with the Adizes Programme’ (Knowledge Exchange, Santa Monica CA) Adizes, Ichak (1999): ‘Managing Corporate LifeCycles’ (Prentice Hall Press, Paramus NJ) Adler, Alfred (1922): ‘The Practice & Theory of Individual Psychology’ (Routledge & Kegan Paul, London) Adorno, Theodore, Else Frenkel-Brunswik, Daniel Levinson & R Nevitt Sanford (1950): ‘The Authoritarian Personality’ (Harper & Row, New York NY) Ahrens, R (1954): ‘Beitrag zur Entwicklung des Physiognomie und Mimikerkennens, Teil I, II’ in Zeitschrift fur Experimental und Angewantde Psychologie #2… Read More

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Biological Factors in Crime

Updated: 7 December 2016 Are criminals born or ‘made’? This is a question which has vexed philosophers for millennia and psychologists and sociologists since the dawn of the behavioural sciences early in the 19th Century. The deterministic view offered by biological explanations for criminality – ie: you have no real choice, it’s in your biological make-up – have major implications for how society treats criminals – especially violent ones.  Biological theories assert criminal behaviour has a physiological origin, with the implication that the ‘criminal’, therefore, has difficulty not committing crime because it is ‘natural’ –  ie: the ‘born criminal’ concept. Biological determinism can be used to undermine the legal concept of criminal responsibility: criminals are held to be personally and morally accountable for their actions. Only when the Law of Diminished Responsibility is applied in cases of self-defence and mental illness – and in some countries (eg: France) ‘crimes of passion’ (temporary insanity) – is the defendant assumed not to have acted from their own free will. 3 cases illustrate how biological arguments have been used as mitigating factors to reduce the level of criminal responsibility:- In 1994 Stephen Mobley was sentenced to death for shooting dead the manager of an American branch of Domino’s Pizza. He was also found… Read More

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