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Keith E Rice's Integrated SocioPsychology Blog & Pages

Aligning, integrating and applying the behavioural sciences

Andreeva’

Robber’s Cave

Relaunched: 4 March 2018 The Robber’s Cave study is on a par with Stanley Milgrim’s ‘Obedience Experiments’ and Philip Zimbardo’s infamous prison study at Stanford University (Craig Haney, Curtis Bank & Philip Zimbardo, 1973), both for its sheer audaciousness and what it tells us about situational pressures to produce normative influence. Muzafer Sherif had been a growing force in the development of Social Psychology ever since his ‘autokinetic effect’ experiments in 1935 had developed the concept of conformity that would come to be known as informational influence. In fact, Sherif could be considered one of the founders of Social Psychology. His work was also highly thought of by interactionist sociologists, becoming the first psychologist to receive the Cooley-Mead Award for contributions to Social Psychology from the American Sociological Association. By the end of the 1940s his interest in understanding social processes, particularly social norms and social conflict had led him to conceive of developing a field experiment in which pubescent boys would be nurtured into forming 2 distinctive teams with strong group identities to see how conflict between the 2 groups could be exacerbated and then reduced. This would be the basis of the famous and challenging Robber’s Cave study of 1954 (Muzafer Sherif et al, 1961).… Read More

Bibliography A

A    B    C    D    E    F    G    H    I    J    K    L    M    N    O    P-Q    R    S     T     U    V    W    X-Y-Z Abrahams, Jessica (2015): ‘Are Men Natural Born Criminals? The Prison Numbers don’t lie’ in Daily Telegraph (13 January) Abramson, Lyn Y, Martin E P Seligman & John Teasdale (1978): ‘Learned Helplessness in Humans: Critique and Reformulation’ in Journal of Abnormal Psychology #87 Adams, Henry, Lester Wright & Bethany Lohr (1996): ‘Is Homophobia associated with Homosexual Arousal?’ in Journal of Abnormal Psychology 105/3 Adizes, Ichak (1987): ‘Corporate LifeCycles: How and Why Corporations Grow and Die and What to Do About It’ (Prentice Hall Press, Englewood Cliffs NJ) Adizes, Ichak (1996): ‘ The Pursuit of Prime: maximise Your Company’s Success with the Adizes Programme’ (Knowledge Exchange, Santa Monica CA) Adizes, Ichak (1999): ‘Managing Corporate LifeCycles’ (Prentice Hall Press, Paramus NJ) Adler, Alfred (1922): ‘The Practice & Theory of Individual Psychology’ (Routledge & Kegan Paul, London) Adorno, Theodore, Else Frenkel-Brunswik, Daniel Levinson & R Nevitt Sanford (1950): ‘The Authoritarian Personality’ (Harper & Row, New York NY) Ahrens, R (1954): ‘Beitrag zur Entwicklung des Physiognomie und Mimikerkennens, Teil I, II’ in Zeitschrift fur Experimental und Angewantde Psychologie #2… Read More

David Cameron’s right about Multiculturalism BUT…

This past weekend David Cameron pushed forward considerably ideas his predecessors Tony Blair and Gordon Brown had been moving progressively towards …. In essence, this is to say pretty explicitly that, if you want to be British, you need to buy into the British identity and British values. (Ironically, freed from the collective responsibility of Cabinet, Blair on these issues is almost certainly well to the right of Cameron these days – see: ‘Radical Islam’ and the Return of Tony Blair). Cameron criticised ‘state multiculturalism’ and argued the UK needs a stronger national identity to stop people turning to extremism. With MI6 warning last week that Britain faces an “‘unstoppable wave of home-grown suicide bombers”, Cameron could hardly have ignored the threat from radicalised young Muslims; and it seems logical to ascribe their lack of identification with ‘British values’ as one cause of their radicalisation. In his speech on Saturday (5 February) Cameron accused multiculturalism of leading to a Britain of ‘divided tribes’. The prime minister posited that the multiculturalist dogma, which increasingly dominated political and social thinking from the early 1970s on, had meant the majority had to accord each minority ethnic group respect and the freedom to pursue its… Read More