Categories

Keith E Rice's Integrated SocioPsychology Blog & Pages

Aligning, integrating and applying the behavioural sciences

‘Labelling Theory’

Putin, Trump and the Endgame for Syria

A  couple of years back I stopped writing about Syria. It wasn’t a deliberate decision. It just seemed to happen.

The routine nature of the horrific atrocities committed with relative abandon by both sides, with advantage seeming to swing first one way and then the other and then the other and then the other yet again seemed endless and wearisome. Everything that could be said seemed to have been said…and yet still it went on. Meanwhile, the Crimea, the Ukraine, the Scottish independence referendum, the Peshawar Massacre, […]

Caregiver Sensitivity vs Temperament Hypothesis

Updated: 17 August 2016

From the time of Sigmund Freud’s first major work in 1900, there has been a stream of thought in Psychology which places responsibility for the development of the child’s personality unequivocally on to the parents – especially the mother. Freud himself (1940) writes: ““The reason why the infant in arms wants to perceive the presence of the mother is only because it already knows by experience that she satisfies all its needs without delay.” He says the […]

Value Systems as Foresight Frameworks #2

PART 2

VS approaches to the future
It is suggested you refer back to the Value System Time Orientation diagram when reading these value system profiles.

A-N/BEIGE: has no cognitive awareness of time at any sense. All actions are geared towards meeting biologically connected functions.
Recommendation for foresight practitioners:-
This value system will not respond to anything at a cognitive level of awareness. If you discover an adult exhibiting these characteristics, it is likely that you will have an elderly person suffering variations of dementia-like […]

Attribution Biases

Updated: 20 April 2016

An attribution bias is  a distortion in perception or judgement about the causes of our own or other people’s behaviour. The attributions people make are not always accurate due to these cognitive biases. Rather than operating as objective perceivers, people are prone to perceptual errors that lead to biased interpretations of their social world

Some of the most important biases are:-

Fundamental Attribution Error
Also known as Correspondence Bias or Overattribution Effect, this is the tendency for people […]

Islamification: Europe’s Challenge #2

PART 2

Preparing for change
British Home Secretary Theresa May was vilified by much of the media for her 6 October speech at the Conservative Party conference for saying (amongst other things):  “… when immigration is too high, when the pace of change is too fast, it’s impossible to build a cohesive society.” (The Guardian’s Alan Travis called it a “new low in politics of migration”.)

However, May was merely echoing the Functionalist argument of Talcott Parsons (1966) that sudden large-scale change disrupts the […]

Attribution Theory

Updated: 17 June 2016

From the work of Fritz Heider. Graphic copyright © 2001 Psychology Press Ltd

According to Fritz Heider (1958), we produce attributions (beliefs about the causes of behaviour) based on two sources of information…

Internal attributions – based on something within the individual whose behaviour is being observed – their natural character
External attributions – based on something external to that individual – nothing to do with who they are specifically, it is the situation they are in

Internal […]

Biological Factors in Crime

Updated: 7 December 2016

Are criminals born or ‘made’? This is a question which has vexed philosophers for millennia and psychologists and sociologists since the dawn of the behavioural sciences early in the 19th Century. The deterministic view offered by biological explanations for criminality – ie: you have no real choice, it’s in your biological make-up – have major implications for how society treats criminals – especially violent ones.  Biological theories assert criminal behaviour has a physiological origin, with the implication that the ‘criminal’, therefore, […]

Crime & Deviance – the Difference

14 January 2012

Crime can be defined as the form of deviance that involves an infraction of the criminal law and is subject to official punishment. Not all laws are criminal – civil law and constitutional law are 2 other key areas of the law. Not all illegal acts are necessarily deviant – eg: in the UK it is illegal to use your mobile phone (without it being handsfree) while driving but the sheer number of people who do so suggests […]

Symbolic Interactionism

Updated: 3 October 2015

Symbolic Interactionism is an Interactionist approach in Sociology – although it also has a strong influence in Social Psychology, particularly in the use of phenomenonology to exolore the unique experience of the individual. It contrasts with approaches like Marxism and Functionalism which seem to suggest that people are like puppets controlled by the relations of  production or the pattern variables,  Rather than people slotting into their respective slots in the structure of society, Interactionism sees […]