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Keith E Rice's Integrated SocioPsychology Blog & Pages

Aligning, integrating and applying the behavioural sciences

‘Integrated SocioPsychology’

Crime & Deviance – the Difference

14 January 2012 Crime can be defined as the form of deviance that involves an infraction of the criminal law and is subject to official punishment. Not all laws are criminal – civil law and constitutional law are 2 other key areas of the law. Not all illegal acts are necessarily deviant – eg: in the UK it is illegal to use your mobile phone (without it being handsfree) while driving but the sheer number of people who do so suggests that they do not see that behaviour as deviant. Sociologists have suggested 2 distinct definitions of deviance: normative and relativistic. Deviance: the Normative Definition This definition can be summed up as ‘the violation of social norms’. Thus, deviance is culturally determined. Deviance is often thought of in terms of deviation from accepted social standards – eg: certain kinds of sexual behaviour or drug use. However, people who are mentally ill are often treated as deviants. (See What is Mental Illness? ) Even harmless eccentrics may be considered deviant – or, according to Erich Goode (2008), people who have been heavily tattooed or pierced. In some cultures, deviation from a strict political and/or religious orthodoxy is considered deviant and may invoke penalties under… Read More

Dimensions of Temperament

Updated: 4 February 2016 Looking at the 4 personality types depicted in the graphic above, which most accurately describes you? By ‘you’, we mean the natural you, the you you don’t have to work at, the you which feels most comfortable to you when there are no pressures to be anyone else. We’re talking about the you you were born with: your natural temperamental type. Of course, very, very few people remain totally true to that type in all circumstances – especially when their vMEMES motivate them to do things beyond their temperamental type. (For example, as someone slightly on the Melancholic side, when leading a workshop event, I find my ORANGE’s achievement orientation will lead me to perform in an outgoing, even charismatic way that contains little hint of my natural mild Introversion.) How much you are any one type will depend on where you tend to locate naturally on each of the 2 Dimensions of Neuroticism and Extraversion. A number of studies have supported Hans J Eysenck’s (1967) contention that our default position on these Dimensions is birthed in us. One such was James Shields (1976) finding that monozygotic (MZ) twins were significantly more similar in Extraversion and Neuroticism  than were… Read More

Symbolic Interactionism

Updated:  19 May 2017 Symbolic Interactionism is an Interactionist approach in Sociology – although it also has a strong influence in Social Psychology, particularly in the use of phenomenonology to exolore the unique experience of the individual. It contrasts with approaches like Marxism and Functionalism which seem to suggest that people are like puppets controlled by the relations of  production or the pattern variables,  Rather than people slotting into their respective slots in the structure of society, Interactionism sees ‘society’ as being created by people actively working at relationships and thus morphing and changing as the dynamics of those relationships morph and change. Symbolic Interactionism is about creating and responding to symbols and ideas (memes). It is this dynamic that forms the basis of Interactionists’ studies. Sociological areas that have been particularly influenced by Symbolic Interactionism include the sociology of emotions, the sociology of health and illness, deviance and crime, collective behaviour/social movements, and the sociology of sex. Interactionist concepts that have gained widespread usage include definition of the situation, emotion work, impression management, looking glass self and total institution. Symbolic Interactionism derived initially from the writings of George Herbert Mead (1934). He argued that people’s selves are social products –… Read More

FAQs

This purpose of these Frequently Asked Questions pages is to furnish supplemental and incidental information about Integrated SocioPsychology, the theories and models in the behavioural sciences which are aligned by its framework. They also provide information relevant to the services I offer. FAQs are obviously products of their time. However, they are updated from time to time as new thinking emerges. Please select a category menu below to look for a FAQ to answer your query. If none of the existing FAQs answer your query, you can use the Contact facility to send me your own FAQ. Under normal circumstances, I will aim to compile a new FAQ within a week. If it will take me longer, I will advise you.   Theory FAQs          Updated: 16/05/16 Society FAQs Services FAQs Miscellaneous FAQs

Reciprocal Determinism

Updated: 2 May 2016 The model of Reciprocal Determinism was developed by Albert Bandura (1977). It considers how what we do and who we spend time with – our Behaviour – impacts upon and changes the life conditions in the Environment we experience and how we respond cognitively and emotionally – and possibly physiologically too – as a Person to the environmental feedback we then receive. Unlike the determinism of straight-forward Behaviourism, Bandura posits that we can influence the Environment as well as the Environment influencing us. Bandura (1999) terms the actor acting upon their environment personal agency. If the environmental feedback is favourable, then that will have a reinforcing effect likely to lead to repetition of the behaviour. If the environmental feedback is unfavourable, then that may lead to changes in beliefs and attitudes and consequently behaviour, depending on just what sense we make of the feedback. The sense we make will clearly depend on what meta-programmes are being run by what vMEMES and what schemas are challenged. Bandura was the leading Social Learning theoretician of the mid-late 20th Century. While the concept of the Environment determining Behaviour is rooted in Behaviourism, Social Learning Theory built on Edward C Tolman’s (1932) position of there… Read More

Personal Therapy

Updated: 24 July 2019 PLEASE NOTE: I WILL NOT BE TAKING ANY NEW CLIENTS AFTER 1 SEPTEMBER 2019 WITH A VIEW TO TERMINATING PROVISION OF THIS SERVICE COMPLETELY BY 31 MARCH 2020   “The only person holding you back is you!” – Jack Holt, Stelram Engineering Ltd DEPRESSED? ~ LOW SELF-ESTEEM? ~ RELATIONSHIP PROBLEMS? Are YOU happy with what You believe about Yourself? Can Personal Therapy help You to lead a more fulfilling life? Negative thoughts!! Do you sometimes find yourself thinking thoughts such as.… I’m not worthy Nobody likes me I can’t do that I’m bad I can’t make it work People find me boring I’m disgusting I’m useless I’m so shy I can’t cope with meeting people I can’t stop myself from doing that… Members of the opposite sex don’t find me attractive It’s amazing how many sophisticated and intelligent people suffer from such unhealthy, unwholesome and unhelpful thoughts. These are what in Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP) we call ‘limiting beliefs’ and in Cognitive Psychology ‘maladaptive schemas’. They lower our self-esteem and reduce our self-efficacy (Albert Bandura’s 1977 term for our belief in our ability to acquire and use learning and resources for our benefit). Limiting beliefs stop us doing… Read More

About This Site…

Relaunched: 1 December 2015  Obviously one key purpose of this site is to tell you about me and how I might be able to help you – see About Me… The other key purpose is to present what I call Integrated SocioPsychology. I coined the term ‘Integrated SocioPsychology’ in 2004 for a comprehensive and cohesive approach I intuited could align and integrate all the different (and all too-often bickering!) disciplines in the behavioural sciences. To make cohesive sense of all the theories, models and interventions in the behavioural sciences and the complimentary ‘hard sciences’ (Biology, Neuroscience), I am using the concepts of the Gravesian approach (vMEMES) – and Clare W Graves’ research on which it is based – to underpin the new science of Memetics and Robert Dilts’ Neurological Levels structure and develop the approach I think of as Integrated SocioPsychology. The Dimensions of Temperament construct of Hans J Eysenck serves well to describe individual temperamental dispositions while the framework of 4Q/8L enables multi-context ‘big picture’ views. The concept of Integrated SocioPsychology postulates the complementarity of much in the academic disciplines of Psychology and Sociology and what are often considered alternative fields such as Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP). The overarching paradigm of Integrated… Read More

Career

1988-1996    1997   1998     1999     2000     2001    2002      2003     2004     2005     2006     2007     2008     2009     2010     2011     2012     2013     2014      2015     2016     2017     2018      2019 21st Century Group     HemsMESH     Humber MeshWORKS     Humberside MESH Network Updated: 15 December 2018 A middle class boy, born to parents from the upper working classes who had worked their way up into the lower professional grades, I was privileged to have parents who both cared for me and drove me – especially my father. My parents – like most! – had many faults and left me with more than a few issues – see: The Counsellor gets counselled! Yet overall they gave me a good start in life, pushing me through the 11-Plus and the grammar school system to do what had been almost impossible for upper working class teenagers of their generation: to go to university. I was raised mostly in the Lancashire (now Merseyside) town of St Helens…but the bulk of my family were in nearby Liverpool. And Liverpool, in the early-mid 1960s was the epicentre of the musical and social revolution that began with The Beatles and expanded through ‘Merseybeat’. A tremendously exciting time to be in… Read More

Training

Updated: 14 October 2015 “It is certainly a course everyone should do who is involved with young people and their future prospects. BRILLIANT!” – Angela Ogilvie,  Head of Year 9, St Mary’s College, Hull, 2001 What began in February 2001 as An Introduction to Spiral Dynamics & Related Models of Neuro-Linguistic Programming has grown into a range of courses dealing with the theory and applications of Integrated SocioPsychology. (See Courses for details on upcoming open workshops.) The behavioural sciences are concerned with explaining why people behave and think as they do. Unfortunately the behavioural sciences are fractured by both inter-discipline and inter-school differences – which have often escalated into long-running disputes. Additionally there is a reluctance in many university Psychology and Sociology departments to recognise approaches such as Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP) which are on the fringe of ‘academia’. (Even though they are often grounded in extensive investigative studies and are supported by much thought and research in the universities themselves!) Integrated SocioPsychology draws upon the Gravesian approach, NLP models such as Neurological Levels and Meta-States, so-called academic or ‘conventional’ Psychology models such as Dimensions of Temperament and Reciprocal Determinism, and much thought in the sociological schools of Symbolic Interactionism and Functionalism – all… Read More

Society & Community

These pages use the models and theories of the Integrated SocioPsychology approach and the behavioural sciences in general for analysing and understanding how we interact and function in societies and communities. They look at those social forces which influence our behaviour, taking into account cultural and cross-cultural factors. More immediately-topical observations can be found in the Blog. There are both miscellaneous features and sections on topics which I believe to be particularly relevant to the functioning of a society…such as business, education and crime & deviance. Critically important is the section on MeshWORKS – the concept developed by Don Beck which facilitates both a longitudinal and a cross-sectional view of related issues for all relevant parties. Those who support the Integrated approach and are interested in such matters are invited to submit pieces for publication here as ‘guest features’ or ‘guest reports’. Please get in touch with your ideas via the Contact page. Underclass: the Excreta of Capitalism Feature exploring the concept that the rise of the Underclass is the inevitable waste product of unfettered Capitalism Islamification: Europe’s Challenge Feature exploring what Islamification might mean for Europe and how the changes it will bring might best be handled Social Change Pages on social… Read More